Resources

The Forest Smallholders Project is committed to documenting, analysing and disseminating lessons learnt from testing solutions to MSME challenges. This is important because some of the solutions tested can be adapted and upscaled to other settings. Please access the following resources for lessons learnt and analyses from the pilots in Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Viet Nam. As the Project is strengthening its documentation and dissemination effort, new resources will be added as they become available.

Resources

The Forest Smallholders Project is committed to documenting, analysing and disseminating lessons learnt from testing solutions to MSME challenges. This is important because some of the solutions tested can be adapted and upscaled to other settings. Please access the following resources for lessons learnt and analyses from the pilots in Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Viet Nam. As the Project is strengthening its documentation and dissemination effort, new resources will be added as they become available.

Briefings

Promoting legality within the private forest sector: obstacles and incentives to formalization

In the informal forest sector, micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) are often characterised as “illegal”. This is the case when their modes of production, sources of raw material or legal status do not conform to their country’s regulatory requirements. In this brief, the FAO-EU FLEGT Programme and EFI make a case for acknowledging the complex circumstances of forest-sector MSMEs and argue that if MSMEs do opt to formalise their business, there should be incentives and support to ensure that they benefit from formal status.

COVID-19 impacts on wood-based MSMEs in Myanmar

MSMEs are the backbone of Myanmar’s economy. They constitute 99% of formally registered enterprises and generate significant livelihood and employment opportunities. But the pandemic has had severe impacts on customer demand, revenue, finances, workers and the availability and distribution of raw materials. Myanmar’s MSMEs also face difficulties accessing support from COVID-19 relief programmes. These are the findings of a survey of some 200 MSMEs conducted by the European Forest Institute (EFI) and the Sagawa Institute of Organization Development.

Supporting forest- and timber-based MSMEs in the Mekong region to operate legally and sustainably

MSMEs are a vehicle for development and generate almost half of jobs in the formal forest sector globally. They are key to local economies, generating significant livelihood and employment opportunities. Yet the recent economic crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic has shown the vulnerability of MSMEs to sudden market developments. This brief describes the approach adopted by the European Forest Institute (EFI) over the last five years to support forest- and timber-based MSMEs in the Mekong region to operate legally and sustainably. The publication highlights the challenges and solutions tested, and lessons learnt from EFI’s interventions.
European Forest Institute

Small and micro-sized entities in the Mekong region’s forest sector: a situational analysis in the FLEGT context

Little is known about wood-based MSMEs in the Mekong region, their characteristics, the number and gender of people involved in the businesses, their supply chains and levels of compliance with regulations. This brief provides analysis, insights and recommendations to improve the position of MSMEs in the Mekong forestry sector. It describes the types of businesses, their size and prevalence in the Mekong countries, how they operate and how they have organised themselves. It also outlines the reasons and consequences for informality, while also looking at the participation and empowerment of women in these enterprises.

Information note

  • Diagnoses and regulatory assessments of small, micro and informal forest-products enterprises in the Mekong Region

Presentations

Video

Stories

Homegrown trees provide additional income in Thailand

In the late 1980s, the Government of Thailand imposed a logging ban in all natural forests. Together with the depletion of forest resources, the ban led to a drop in domestic supply. The Government therefore looked for ways to involve the private sector and in particular local communities in generating alternative wood supplies. Changes introduced in 2019 in the law governing forestry may finally promote reforestation efforts.
Agus Djailani, European Forest Institute

Old wood gets a new lease on life in Thailand

In Lamphun province near Chiang Mai in northern Thailand a 20-year-old wooden house is being demolished. The workers are dismantling the house piece by piece, rescuing all teak wood. Currently there is a booming domestic market for reclaimed timber in Thailand. It is increasingly contributing to the local economy and has become an important source of livelihood for household businesses in the wood sector.